iftop: network counterpart of top

tux_compIf you have used top and wished that you had something like that to check your network usage your wish is granted. iftop does the same for a network interface by showing you the bandwidth usage. Available in synaptic.

Check this article to count the number of open connections and other useful network hacks.

Webpage: iftop

Photon+ EC156 on Ubuntu & Funbook

cool_penguin_smallI got the TATA Photon Plus device (EC156) that comes at Rs. 500 with Micromax Funbook today. I could get it working on Ubuntu 12.04 (Precise Pangolin) with the following procedure:

  1. Connect the device and select Edit Connections… from system tray Network Manager.
  2. Go to Mobile Broadband tab and click Add.
  3. The device should be automatically detected in the next window. Otherwise install modemmanager and ppp related software from synaptic, restart and start from step 1.
  4. Click Continue and select country (India). Continue.
  5. Select Tata Indiacom (Photon+). Continue.
  6. In next window check the selections and Apply.
  7. Edit the newly added connection.
  8. Go to Mobile Broadband tab. APN should be set already (#777). Set Username: internet, Password: password.

You are ready to roll.

To use the TATA Photon Plus wizard pre-installed on the dongle, check this post.

To setup on Micromax Funbook:

  1. Connect the dongle using the USB converter cable. Go to Settings.
  2. Go to More… Turn off Airplane mode.
  3. Select Mobile networks.
  4. Set both Data enabled and Data roaming on.
  5. Select Access Point Names.
  6. The entry for TATA should be present already. Just tap on the small circle beside the entry to the right side to select it. It should be enabled showing a blue dot.

Open browser and browse. Enjoy!

PS: I am NOT the right person to help you with TATA Photon Plus purchasing. So please don’t post any queries on how to purchase or where to contact here. Call up the Photon Plus helpline.

PPS: Micromax seldom releases updates for their products. So rethink before purchasing their products.

Hacking broadband on Linux

cool_penguin_smallPrerequisites

1. To check my actual network IP address: http://www.whatismyip.com
2. A dictionary of common router passwords: http://www.routerpasswords.com
3. nmap and whois tools available in Linux. [Try “nmap –help” for quick description of the switches available. whois is self-explanatory.]

Procedure

If users do not take necessary precautions, it’s too easy to reach the router settings of broadband users.

First I checked my actual IP address @ http://www.whatismyip.com
I found that it is 117.192.11.xxx

So I ran nmap on this range on port 80:

$ nmap 117.192.11.1-255 -p80 > scanres

I opened the file scanres in vi and searched for “open”. I found the following entries:

portscan_comp

In order to check some more information like who the IP belongs to, I used:

$ whois 117.192.11.xxx

Now I have got a vulnerable IP with port 80 open. I tried opening it in Firefox and it asked for the username and pwd:

auth_comp

I tried out default usernames and pwds for some common routers in India from www.routerpasswords.com and I could hack into the router in 4/5 tries. [Sometimes the authentication string shows the make of the router. For example TD-W8901G means a TP-Link router, IB-xxxxx means an IBall router. Some manufacturers must be real dumb to do it!] I entered the Interface Setup and could find the PPPoE username. And an 8-dot password almost always means “password”. As users have no way of changing it, the “password” is as good as hard-coded.

router-page_comp

Finding a weak router will take around 40 seconds for a seasoned hacker who will reduce the IP range +/-25 his own IP as the nmap scan range.

DISCLAIMER: THIS IS STRICTLY A DEMONSTRATION OF ETHICAL HACKING AND TO ALERT PEOPLE SO THEY CAN GUARD THEMSELVES AGAINST SUCH VULNERABILITIES. PLEASE DO NOT USE THIS INFORMATION FOR DATA THEFT. THAT’S NOT MY INTENTION.