Google Chrome uses QUIC to boost transfer speeds

chrome_compQUIC is a new transport protocol being developed by Google. It is experimental at the time of writing and aims to reduce the data transfer latency over TCP+TLS+SPDY. TCP being a very well-established protocol, and most of the time implemented by the operating system, Google couldn’t change it significantly. Continue reading Google Chrome uses QUIC to boost transfer speeds

fwupd: update UEFI firmware from session software

chipUpdating firmware on a device is, in general, tricky. Most vendors ask to boot into BIOS mode, or a DOS/custom environment and apply the update files which typically come as binary files. In short, there’s no standard procedure. Things change a bit with UEFI where the specification and the stakeholders target standardizing many of the associated processes too. Continue reading fwupd: update UEFI firmware from session software

Let’s Encrypt: free SSL/TLS certificate

letsencrypt_compIf you are worried about trusting security certificates from just any issuer while browsing the internet or downloading stuff (and you should rightfully be), Mozilla and some other organizations are about to make things less scary for you from Q2 2015. The initiative makes it easier for server operators too. Continue reading Let’s Encrypt: free SSL/TLS certificate

Debian working on reproducible builds

debian_compDebian is working on a new project named “reproducible builds” with the stated goal – It should be possible to reproduce, byte for byte, every build of every package in Debian. This essentially means that a binary can be tracked back to its source package, repository and even the build. Continue reading Debian working on reproducible builds

Static Linux: Linux with handpicked static tools

tux_compStatically linked executables run faster than dynamically linked executables because of the time saved in loading libraries from the filesystem and linking the necessary information. However, statically linked executables can be of considerably larger size as all the information is in the same binary. Continue reading Static Linux: Linux with handpicked static tools

lazytime: beyond atime and relatime

tux_compHistorically Linux maintains 3 timestamps for a file following POSIX standards:

1. ctime: last time metadata or content was changed
2. mtime: last time content was modified
3. atime: last time file was accessed

Note that ctime and mtime are often same,
unless only the file attributes are updated.
In that case only ctime gets updated.

atime is the problematic one among these 3. Repeated disk access to update the access time change can affect Continue reading lazytime: beyond atime and relatime